Saturday, October 03, 2009

Clove Cigarettes Banned

And the bans go on! Obama's first (and hopefully last) ban took place without most people even knowing it was going to happen. Clove cigarettes, a popular tobacco substitute, have been banned as part of the anti- tobacco bill Obama signed earlier on.

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6 Comments:

At 1:46 PM, Blogger professorlock'n'load said...

Just one more of many attempts at legislating morality.....an ultimately impossible task.

 
At 1:59 PM, Blogger professorlock'n'load said...

On road rules.....hmmm, it's do-able. I mean, ever see a head on collision in a column of ants?

http://www.metacafe.com/watch/842109/crazy_intersection/

 
At 11:51 AM, Blogger Jim said...

FROM: Go ASK ALICE....
Contrary to popular belief, clove cigarettes, also called kreteks, contain tobacco — they are made up of 60-70 percent tobacco and 30-40 percent shredded cloves (a spice). Considering their tobacco content, clove cigarettes are probably as harmful and dangerous as regular cigarettes. As a matter of fact, kreteks may hold even more risk than ordinary smokes. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), clove cigarettes produce at least twice as much nicotine, tar, and carbon monoxide as regular American cigarettes brands.

Plus, there may be an additional risk due to their clove content. The major active ingredient in cloves is eugenol, which is a topical anesthetic used in dentistry. The short- and long-term health effects of eugenol are not well known, and little inhalation toxicology research has been done on this substance. However, when smoked, eugenol numbs the throat and impairs the gag reflex. This anesthetizing effect could cause some problems; for example, liquids and/or food could more easily go down the wrong pipe. Smokers may not feel the harshness of the smoke as strongly, so they are more likely to inhale the smoke more deeply and hold it in the lungs for a longer period of time before exhaling. As a result, it's possible, or even likely, that eugenol has the potential to facilitate lung infections, respiratory illnesses, or allergic reactions in certain users, especially in smokers with existing breathing problems and/or other sensitivities.

 
At 1:12 PM, Blogger Fred said...

So?

 
At 12:25 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

And the biggest backers of this bill was US large tobacco. WTO has started a anti-trust suit already.

 
At 9:57 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

I am sort of upset, but djarum was nice enough to keep the cloves in the form of a cigar. They come in a 12 pack for $2 cheaper, they burn slower, and they come in a black tube rather than white because they are now considered a cigar. They taste the same, thank god!

 

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