Thursday, July 26, 2007

Bottled Water Is Good!

I was surprised to see a rebuttal in the Eureka Reporter to Susan Morton's op- ed the other day about bottled water. Not that I didn't expect someone might have something to say about it. I just didn't think the reason would be chlorinated tap water.

I've been even more surprised that chlorinated tap water wasn't brought up in any of the debates over water fluoridation, either here or anywhere else. Being opposed to water fluoridation- not for health reasons but as a matter of choice- I was expecting a comment from fluoridation proponents any minute:

We chlorinate water to make it safe. Should we take chlorine out of our water as well....

I don't know about that. I do actually have a Multi- Pure water filter that removes chlorine from the water, although I don't believe it removes fluoride. I don't know what to think about the supposed ill effects of chlorine Ms. Lewis refers to, although I've heard some of them from way back when.

Interesting ideas she brings up about using ozone or ultraviolet light for treating water, though. Maybe we should take a look at those options? I don't know.

One thing I'm wondering is how much of the bottled water being sold is chlorinated? After all, I'm told a lot of bottled water comes from a tap somewhere.

26 Comments:

At 9:09 AM, Blogger Carol said...

Kristabel will be happy!

I bet she'll have bottled water at her wedding.

 
At 9:11 AM, Blogger Fred said...

Kristabel needs a water filter.

 
At 9:30 AM, Anonymous mresquan said...

Is chlorine not added to the water to offset fluoride atoms which would continually reproduce?
All water has fluoride as it's a natural occurrence.Not sure about chlorine.I'd wonder what the level of it is now in Manila prior to any added fluoridation?I've never seen the results of such a study.
But most of all,I hope everyone is concerned about what the costs are going to be to have anything that has come into contact with "unhealthy" amounts of fluoride when the feds demand that municipalities who have added excess of it remove it and fix the damages it may have caused on anything it may have come into contact with.I predict that those days lie not so far ahead,and it's a decent reason to not support adding it,you may ending paying for it big time.

 
At 9:34 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

I'll continue buying bottled water so long as my tap water is fluoridated.

It's been said many times. Fluoride activists should be fighting to legalize stevia in the US. It's a 0 calorie, 0 cavity, all natural sweetener that is 100 times sweeter than sugar. You can buy it in raw form at natural food stores, but it's illegal (in the US) to put it in processed food. Why? The usual reason: corporate interests.

In the meantime, I oppose well-intentioned, but backward actions like water additives that don't offer a way to opt-out.

 
At 11:08 AM, Blogger Pogo said...

mresquan: "...fluoride atoms which would continually reproduce?"
Tell us more about the sex life of fluoride atoms. We're fascinated.

 
At 11:48 AM, Blogger Derchoadus said...

Jeez, all you need to do is use an Activated Charcoal filter to remove
Fluoride and the Chloroamines that the water company puts into your water for your benefit. Most chloroamines that are added to municipal water systems will dissipate with oxidation and exposure to ultraviolet light (sunlight), ie: leave it sit around in the sun.

It's just basic water chemistry. And, no, fluoride atoms don't continually reproduce. Fluoride is actually one of the most chemically reactive elements in nature. It will want to bond to any anion around to become stable. Because of this they add fluoride in the form of a Fluoroamine, which has an affinity for activated charcoal. Thus you can filter it out of your water using the correct filter media.

 
At 12:14 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Yes derchoadus, because it's every citizen's responsibility to pay for water service and then pay on top of that extra money to filter our additives we didn't ask for.

What's funny is that it's the environmental crowd pushing to stop bottled water use while also pushing fluoride upon us. You can't have it both ways. Choose which one is more important to you.

 
At 12:36 PM, Blogger Fred said...

Derchoadus wrote"all you need to do is use an Activated Charcoal filter to remove Fluoride and the Chloroamines".

Hmmm... I was under the impression my multi pure filter didn't remove fluoride, but maybe that because I was assuming fluoride was a natural occurring mineral, which the multi pure filter doesn't affect.

Just checked the multipure website
http://www.multipureco.com/index.html

and didn't see any mention of fluoride, but it did say it removed chloroamines. It does remove chlorine and the wife says the unchlorinated water makes better tasting coffee.

12:14 wrote, "then pay on top of that extra money to filter our additives we didn't ask for.".

It's not a bad idea to have a filter even if they don't add stuff to your water. Other stuff can end up in the water, as well. That and just plain old sentiment.

I never used a filter until shortly after we moved into this house. Right after we moved here I poured a glass of water and noticed all kinds of brown stuff in the water. Sentiment, I would think, but it certainly didn't make me happy about having to drink it.

Ran into a multi- pure sales girl just days after that and ended up buying one of their filters. Pricey ($300+-, back then), but it should last a lifetime with occasional replacement of the cartridge.

 
At 1:11 PM, Blogger Derchoadus said...

Fluoride and Chloride are two elements that act the same at the ionic level. Both are great for killing viruses and bacteria. The addition of Chloroamine is required by law to keep our water pipes from becoming breading grounds for things that will make you sick. Not much you can do about it, except to drill your own well. But there are problems with that, ask Kristabel.


Fred, if your filter takes out chlorine, it also takes out fluorine. That means it's using activated charcoal. I filter all my tap water for internal use. Not just for all the amines, but for all the dirt, rust and debris floating around the water system.

 
At 1:48 PM, Blogger Kristabel said...

Wow...I'm so glad that I've only had to worry about intestinal parasites in the water and not chlorine or fluoride! ;)

 
At 1:57 PM, Anonymous mresquan said...

I thought for some reason that most of Loleta was supported by well water,and that it was fairly nasty at times.

 
At 2:47 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Filtering out fluoride is expensive. I'll stick to pure bottled water.

 
At 3:01 PM, Blogger ΛΕΟΝΙΔΑΣ said...

In Weitchpec our water came from a spring fed pond. There was a lot of SEDIMENT in it as well as small amount of bacteria. We used this filter and it still works well for us here in Georgia where the water is yucky tasting. The filters are ceramic and can be cleaned many times before replacement.

 
At 3:49 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Is a charcoal filter the same as osmosis system? In talking to oneof the directors for MCSD I was told that was the type of filter that had to be used for fluoride to be removed and it cost about $1,000 or more.

 
At 4:23 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

"...Other stuff can end up in the water, as well. That and just plain old sentiment."

Yes. Sentiment.

As in "I think I'll take a Sentimental Journey to the Co-op and buy myself a Multi-Pure Filter big enough to purify the Big Muddy down by the Old Mill Stream.

Hee Hee Hee!

 
At 4:24 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

A charcoal filter is not the same as a reverse osmosis system.

 
At 4:42 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

"...and the wife says the unchlorinated water makes better tasting coffee."

I noticed that filtered water tasted better for drinking and for making coffee than regular tap water.

Then I noticed, after replacing the 60 year old cold water intake pipe that used to lead into my house, the regular Eureka tap water tasted really good, even without filtering it. Coffee, too.

I found out why when I saw the old galvanized steel water intake pipe. It had white mineral deposits on it so thick they had even cut back the amount of water that could flow through the pipe.

I guess 60 years can do that to your old pipes!

So anyway, the water pressure is better now, too.

And I don't need to buy bottled water anymore.

 
At 8:48 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Ditto.

 
At 11:04 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

bottled water goes good with a little JD.

 
At 11:04 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

bottled water goes good with a little JD.

 
At 1:18 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

John Driscoll?

 
At 9:39 AM, Blogger Carol said...

"mresquan said...
I thought for some reason that most of Loleta was supported by well water,and that it was fairly nasty at times."

Greg and I are live outside the Loleta Water Distict, and we share a well with our neighbor. However, you are right, Loleta, has had problems with the water. Apparently, it got bad after the 1992 earthquakes. I believe the water district has recently switched to a different well, and the water situation has improved somewhat.

 
At 11:31 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

John Donne.

 
At 12:14 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

John Denver?

 
At 12:34 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Jefferson Davis?

 
At 10:52 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Speaking of bottled water, does the plastic exude any chemicals into the pure mountain spring water?

 

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