Wednesday, September 07, 2016

That Epipen Situation

The National Center for Policy Analysis looks at the Epipen price increase situation that's made the news recently- the price of those life saving tools having more than doubled all of the sudden

I'm not sure it's fair to ignore the producer's jacking of prices for no obvious reason, but much of the blame lies with the Food and Drug Administration, according to the NCPA. To be fair to the FDA, I don't expect them to ignore patents, but they seem to routinely hold back development of generics and improved versions of drugs.

The article does point out it might help if epipens were available over the counter (OTC) rather than only by prescription. OTC's nearly always being less expensive than prescriptions. The article claims epipens would cost around $20.00 if sold as OTC. Another one of those things where government gets in the way:
Twenty dollars. That’s probably about how much a generic EpiPen twin-pack would cost if the FDA approved an over-the-counter version or a version pharmacists could dispense to patients without a doctor’s prescription. Greater access could potentially save lives by making epinephrine more widely available. An OTC version would also save Americans nearly $1 billion a year. - See more at: http://healthblog.ncpa.org/epipen-a-case-study-in-whats-the-matter-with-health-care/#sthash.mEr4Zawt.17TswxNU.dpuf

It also points out there are less expensive alternatives currently available- epinephrine being available in ampules for less than a dollar that could be injected by syringe. Not sure I'd like that option (hate needles).

Then there's Adrenaclick, a competing auto injector costing $145.00, so I guess there is some competition.

I'm glad I'm not one of those super allergic types. Don't know that I could afford epipens unless they were available over the counter. Then again, I hate needles so not sure I'd have the guts to use them anyway.


The epinephrine injected by the EpiPen is available in an ampule for less than $1. In theory any generic drug maker could merely apply to sell syringes pre-filled with epinephrine. But the FDA would likely reject that as less safe than the EpiPen. - See more at: http://healthblog.ncpa.org/epipen-a-case-study-in-whats-the-matter-with-health-care/#sthash.mEr4Zawt.17TswxNU.dpuf
 
The epinephrine injected by the EpiPen is available in an ampule for less than $1. In theory any generic drug maker could merely apply to sell syringes pre-filled with epinephrine. But the FDA would likely reject that as less safe than the EpiPen. - See more at: http://healthblog.ncpa.org/epipen-a-case-study-in-whats-the-matter-with-health-care/#sthash.mEr4Zawt.17TswxNU.dpuf

2 Comments:

At 11:19 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

It costs no more than $10 by the bottle.

 
At 1:28 PM, Blogger Sally Sheffield said...

The pharmaceutical industry is making way to much money by overpricing the Epipen. This is emergency medicine that should be affordable. Besides they've had the patent for a long time already. Thankfully i don't need it, or any prescription meds. They do look like they're violent to administer from the demonstration on the news! Yikes!

 

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