Thursday, February 17, 2011

Buy American?

Sure. Why not? Still, I get more than a little annoyed by those who advocate heavy tariffs to bring the price of foreign goods up to match American ones. As this fellow explains, high prices have their own harmful effects on the economy:

"- Because “buying American more often” means buying low-priced imports less often, Americans’ spending power will shrink. Americans will then have less money to spend at the movies, at local restaurants, on premium cable-tv packages, and the like."

So true, and I'm one that generally can't afford higher prices on anything. Still, it is a shame there aren't more things available we can buy that were made here. I want to see more American manufacturing jobs available along with more quality goods. It seems most things I buy nowadays are made overseas, and often the quality is lacking.

Here's your chance to plug American made products. If you know of an American made product that's not too much more expensive than a foreign one, let me know and maybe I'll consider buying it now and then.

Only two things come to mind off the top of my head: D- Con Rat Poison, although I'm not sure if the Chinese make rat poison, and New Balance shoes. I've been told New Balance are made in America, although I'm unsure of the cost/quality comparison.

Anything else?

14 Comments:

At 8:31 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

In summary, Fred thinks foreign companies that pay slave wages shouldn't face tariffs because it would mean he pays more for products, but he also laments the downfall of American manufacturing and that he can't buy more American-made products.

That's classic Fred logic. He doesn't understand that every dollar he spends is a vote and that he voted this system into place.

 
At 8:34 AM, Blogger lodgepole said...

Fire and Light products.

 
At 8:36 AM, Blogger Fred said...

"Fred thinks foreign companies that pay slave wages shouldn't face tariffs because it would mean he pays more for products,"

The "slave wages" we keep hearing about by a lot more in their country than it would here. That's a bs argument. Things are generally cheaper across the border. It's nice for the less affluent to be able to take advantage of lower prices.

If we did things your way, we'd all be living in poverty.

 
At 9:28 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Slave wages is a valid argument. Are you filling your gap in knowledge with fluff? Do you know what I'm talking about when I say slave wages? Do you know the cost of the products you buy? Obviously not. A little less Fox News might help.

 
At 9:56 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Oh, give up. Fred bases his opinions on what's best for Fred. Evidence be damned.

 
At 10:25 AM, Blogger Ernie Branscomb said...

I'm sorry, but Fred, just like everybody else, is born with the responsibility to take care of himself, and survive.

We elect our government officials to take care of the general public. That means if China is subsidizing a product to dump in the American economy, and shovel money to China, we should be protected from that. Our government has the ability to print money, Fred doesn't. Every American is being screwed by our elected officials, that are almost wholly financed by wealthy stock speculators. FOUL!!!

 
At 10:38 AM, Blogger Fred said...

Fred bases his opinions on what's best for Fred.

And you think not buying products from people who work for "slave wages" is doing them a favor?

 
At 10:48 AM, Blogger Fred said...

That means if China is subsidizing a product to dump in the American economy, and shovel money to China, we should be protected from that.

So, you're saying that if a person is poor, they should be forced to buy goods that might cost much, much more because the government knows what's best for them?

How do you feel about California restricting its residents to more expensive eggs? Prop 2 aside, they've made it law that less expensive, conventionally raised, eggs can't be imported into this state from other states. Do you think that's ok?

That sort of protectionist attitude seems to me to be literally taking food from people's mouths.

 
At 2:01 PM, Anonymous redwhiteandbluegirl said...

I was surprised to find that there are actually quite a lot of American products out there that are not overpriced compared to those manufactured in foreign countries. The quality is also great!

My demographic is a bit different than yours, I assume, so what I buy is probably not something you'd purchase. For example, several clothing items can be found at places like Ross and Marshalls at a discounted rate and made in the USA. I even found some New Balance shoes at Marshalls. Yes, they were made in the USA and the same price as all the other shoes that were made in China.

It sure does feel good to buy American and once you start looking at labels you may be surprised at the prices you find.

I buy American and I hope to make a difference :)

 
At 2:45 PM, Blogger Fred said...

I was surprised to find that there are actually quite a lot of American products out there that are not overpriced compared to those manufactured in foreign countries.

That's what I'm wanting to hear about. It seems it's hard for me to find anything but foreign stuff a lot of the time when I want quality.

For instance, the last mop I bought is a piece of crap I believe I bought at Rite- Aid. I looked and can't find anything that says where it was made, but I'm betting China or somewhere in that direction.

It would be nice to find some American stuff when you want to, but much of the time I'll go for foreign stuff if only because that's all I can find, such as in boots and shoes, or the price just can't be beat.

 
At 8:07 PM, Anonymous meme said...

But how much are you saving if it's a "piece of crap" and it falls apart making you have to buy another "piece of crap"? I'd rather spend a little more on something that lasts longer than the first time it is used.

 
At 12:50 AM, Anonymous skippy said...

Fred, I'd like to kindly offer my larger view from above, if you'll allow me.

From my reading and personal knowledge, manufacturing in this country has gone from 27%in the 1950's declining to roughly 13% today. What's taken its place is the financial services sector with converse numbers in comparison. We're not so good at manufacturing anymore-- whether it's products, highways, or building bridges.

The financial services sector, however, is very good. Very good at plundering what's left. Exploiting the commodities, currencies, and stock markets, taking advantage of the failing housing, tech, and energy bubbles we've recently seen are immensely enriching those of the sector. Through the confusingly complex use of credit derivatives and default swaps, flash trading, arbitrage, laddering, index speculation, quantitative computer analysis and numbers theory, tranches, collateralized debt/mortgage obligations, and a host of other inventions most know nothing about, economies are being plundered daily across the globe, including ours.

Certainly readers will remember Wall Street telling us everything was fine on Monday. Come Friday, they said if there wasn't a huge infusion of capital-- a bailout-- the economy would be completely collapsed in several days. This cost trillions of dollars.

In short, the real villian here, Fred, is Wall Street's greed-- their complex mechanisms exploiting every area with little attention or oversight. As the political Right, Left, and even Tea Party yammer at one other in distraction the focus is taken off of this growing problem. The real peril is, more or less, going unnoticed. It will become continually worse-- and as jobs, companies, and profits go off-shore and sheltered, tax-free. The public would be enraged if only they knew. Even Congress doesn't understand what's going on, much less these involved devices.

But, the good news, Fred, is your declining wage or income has more purchasing power. Of cheaper goods manufactured elsewhere bought in big box stores.

One might ask, "Now, on what authority does he know this?" The family's in the business and at the very top of the food chain.

 
At 7:02 AM, Blogger Fred said...

But, the good news, Fred, is your declining wage or income has more purchasing power. Of cheaper goods manufactured elsewhere bought in big box stores.

Exactly. That's part of the point here, although I do have a CNN news item bookmarked about inflation starting up both overseas and in this country so that dollar will be buying less. We're already seeing food, clothing and gas prices going up. It's bound to get worse, especially in California.

 
At 7:07 AM, Blogger Fred said...

meme wrote, I'd rather spend a little more on something that lasts longer than the first time it is used.

Same here, at least on some things. That assumes you can find an the item you're looking for that isn't a piece of crap. Seems to me all the cleaning stuff Rite- Aid had was cheap stuff.

 

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